Tag Archives: Aurangzeb

Aurangzeb’s tomb

It’s a simple resting place for the sixth Mughal emperor, Aurangzeb Alamgir (1658 -1707). Said to be one of the most controversial figures in Indian history, the Muslim emperor Aurangzeb remains a bit of a mystery. He ruled for 49 years over a population of 150 million. He was fabulously rich and even possessed the Kohinoor diamond, which now rests in Queen Elizabeth’s tiara. He built the Bibi Ka Maqbara and one of the largest mosques in the world, the Badshadi Masjid in Lahore, Pakistan.


But his final resting place is an open air grave in Khuldabad, Maharashtra, India.


I wasn’t going to visit it. Why, after all? But then I met several people at the Ellora caves, hometown men from Khuldabad, eager for me to see the resting place of this great ruler.

Aurangzeb is the namesake of Aurangabad, the city where my friend got married. He and I have at least one thing in common; we have both explored the Ellora caves, well according to Audrey Trusche’s book. The Ellora caves were lost for a while and then found and all these dates are escaping me.


The place is special to me, not so much for the emperor who lived back then, but for the people who live in Khuldabad now.